Pigeon Guano

ARD offer a safety driven approach to removing and cleaning up guano, guano removal & clean up needs to be carried out by a professional guano remediation trained personnel, guano is unsightly, unsanitary and poses a health and safety risk, and it doesn’t stop there as it is often infested with blood-feeding insects and its acidic matter causes damage to the fabric of buildings which, in turn, leads to higher cleaning and repair bills.

Bulk pigeon guano is extremely dangerous to both our personnel and public health & safety, all removal work must be undertaken with care within a controlled environment. ARD are specialist guano-removal technicians are trained to a very high standard.

ARD use towable & portable decontamination(shower) units and state of the art H-type & W-type vacuums and low pressure sanitizing disspersment sprays and when required negative pressure units. ARD’ robust approach will ensure the works is undertaken safely and our personnel and clients are not exposed to the health hazards of guano.

After safely removing and treating the bulk guano, we will remove it from the site in secure sacks, and we will then decontaminate the area to prevent returning organisms.

Histoplasmosis is a disease caused by a fungus, which grows in pigeon droppings. It also grows in soils and is found throughout the world. When cleaning droppings a person may breathe in some of the fungus, which in cases of high exposure can cause infection. Common activities, such as cleaning off windowsills, will not result in high exposures.
Symptoms of histoplasmosis begin to appear about 10 days after initial infection and include fatigue, fever, and chest pains. Most people, however, do not show any symptoms. Those with compromised immune systems such as cancer patients or people living with HIV/AIDS are generally more at risk of developing histoplasmosis.

Cryptococcosis is another fungal disease associated with pigeon droppings and also grows in soils throughout the world. It is very unlikely that healthy people will become infected even at high levels of exposure. A major risk factor for infection is a compromised immune system. Researchers at Albert Einstein College of medicine found that 70% of urban children have been exposed to Cryptococcosis.

Psittacosis (also known as ornithosis or parrot fever) is a rare infectious disease that mainly affects parrots and parrot-like birds such as cockatiels, and parakeets, but may also affect other birds, such as pigeons. When bird droppings dry and become airborne people may inhale them and get sick.
In humans, this bacterial disease is characterized by: fatigue, fever, headache, rash, chills, and sometimes pneumonia. Symptoms develop about 10 days after exposure. Psittacosis can be treated with a common antibiotic.

Meningitis – rare, but one causative agent is commonly found in pigeon nests.

Salmonella – diarrhoea, vomiting and in extreme cases septicaemia and possibly death.

Histoplasmosis – a disease caused by a fungus, which grows in pigeon droppings. It also grows in soils and is found throughout the world. When cleaning droppings a person may breathe in some of the fungus, which in cases of high exposure can cause infection such as:

  • Skin diseases.
  • Insects – including mites and fleas.
  • Attraction to rats.
  • Aggravated chest problems and asthma.